Announcing Margin


This post is by MPD from MPD’s Blog - Medium


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We’re excited to announce that our EIR, Chas Sanders, has launched his new company: Margin.

Margin helps physician entrepreneurs manage their ambulatory center’s supply procurement more cost-effectively and efficiently. Ambulatory medical centers (the offices where doctors perform procedures outside of the hospital) spend a significant amount of time and money on supplies. Procuring everything from disposables to capital equipment represents a significant process and few organizations are set up to effectively negotiate pricing.

Margin helps these ambulatory medical centers streamline their procurement and leverages their collective buying power to reduce costs.

The company is led by Chas Sanders whom before serving as an EIR at Interplay spent his career in the health care field. He’s sold implants/devices into numerous medical specialties and recently operated 100 centers throughout the country. We’re excited to be supporting him in his new venture.


Announcing Margin was originally published in MPD’s Blog on Medium, where people are Continue reading “Announcing Margin”

MIB: Scott Kupor on the Information Asymmetry in Venture Investing


This post is by Barry Ritholtz from The Big Picture


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The average VC has done 100s if not 1000s of deals; the typical entrepreneur is on his first or second start up. This creates an information asymmetry between entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. So says Scott Kupor, the first employee at Andreessen Horowitz, and managing partner of the firm today. He is the author of the new book, Secrets of Sand Hill Road: Venture Capital and How to Get It.

The asymmetry creates issues, not only for the entrepreneur, who does not want to be taken advantage of, but also for the VC, who is concerned with finding and funding quality deals. In his book, Kupor provides the road map for start-ups to better understand the nature of venture capital. He explains the advantages that accrue to any start-up founder who knows how to successfully navigate the perils and pitfalls of the entire capital raising process.

Kupor explains why Y Combinator

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MIB: The Venture Capitalists


This post is by Barry Ritholtz from The Big Picture


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I mentioned last week that Masters in Business just turned 5, and I have a few new changes we are rolling out. One of my ideas is to organize all of the shows into various categories to make it easier for anyone interested to do an even deeper dive into a given subject. So consider this the first of several MIB topic explorations.

We had Scott Kupor, managing partner at Andreessen Horowitz on this weekend, so let’s start off with the venture capitalists:

Scott Kupor, Andreessen Horowitz (A16Z) (July 13, 2019)
The first employee at A16Z, he is now the managing partner.

David Hall, Rise of the Rest Fund (December 22, 2018)

Bill Janeway, Warburg Pincus Ventures (August 25, 2018)

Steve Murray, Revolution Growth (May 19, 2018)

Benedict Evans, Andreessen Horowitz (May 5, 2018)

Greg Sands, Costanoa Ventures (November 18, 2017)

Matt Wallaert,

Continue reading “MIB: The Venture Capitalists”

MIB: Scott Kupor, Andreessen Horowitz


This post is by Barry Ritholtz from The Big Picture


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This week, we speak with Scott Kupor, managing partner at Andreessen Horowitz, where he was employee #1 at the firm. Previously he was at Opsware (aka Loudcloud). He is the author of the new book, Secrets of Sand Hill Road: Venture Capital and How to Get It.

Kupor discusses the information asymmetry between entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. In his book, he provides the road map for everything a start up needs to understand the nature of venture capital. We discuss the advantages that accrue to a start up founder who knows how to successfully navigate the perils and pitfalls of the entire capital raising process.

He also discusses why Y Combinator and other seed funds was such a game changer for start ups. They educated entrepreneurs about the process form what  was formerly a black box to something more accessible. The change to the information asymmetry altered the deal funnel

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The rise of European SaaS: apply now to be included in the Accel Euroscape 2019


This post is by Philippe Botteri from Cracking The Code


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-This article was co-authored with my colleague Maxim Filippov and published initially on Tech.eu.
Nominations are now open for the 2019 Accel Euroscape, the annual list of the top 100 cloud companies originating from Europe & Israel. You can apply HERE – applications will be open until 6th September 2019.
The growth of the cloud ecosystem in Europe over the past few years has been explosive. We first started capturing the growing momentum in 2016 with our list of the top European SaaS companies emerging from Europe.
Fast forward three years – Europe has proven that it can produce amazing global software companies. For example, UiPath, the leading Robotic Process Automation company from Romania, valued at $7 billion, may well be one of the fastest-growing enterprise software companies of the decade, with revenues growing from $5 million to $200 million in around 30 months.

Applied Venture and the inexorable rise of value-add VC


This post is by Nic Brisbourne from THE EQUITY KICKER


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When I started in venture capital in the late 1990s VCs were regularly lambasted for taking long summer holidays and spending too much time on the golf course. I remember one enterprising journalist judging VCs on the basis of how much their handicaps had gone down. Low handicaps weren’t good!

During this time, cash was scarce and VCs were firmly in control. Most investors thought of their job as picking good companies and making sure governance was strong. Decades later, things couldn’t be more different. After about twenty years of different forms of value-added services in VC, it feels like we are approaching a new plateau, to which everyone aspires and few have achieved.

In this post, I want to look at this new plateau, describe how we got here and offer three reasons why this trend has been gathering steam.

It begins

From around 2000, and perhaps coinciding with

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The Wrong Reasons to Pursue Venture Capital: Salaries and Personal Credibility


This post is by MPD from MPD’s Blog - Medium


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This post is a continuation of my series of key segments from my book, The Fundraising Rules.

There are a lot of good reasons for entrepreneurs pursue venture capital, including scaling your company more rapidly, developing complex technologies or entering new markets. There are, however, bad reasons to pursue venture capital.

Two of the most common wrong reasons to pursue venture capital are the pursuit of a steady paycheck for the founders and personal credibility.

Raising VC for the sole purpose of obtaining a salary is not the right approach. Raising venture capital is commitment to far more than just raising money; it’s a commitment to manage your company for growth (not profits) and to work towards ends consistent with the needs of your venture partners. If all you need is a suitable salary, you may be able to achieve this objective by raising smaller amounts of capital from angels or

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Fiverr rings the NYSE bell


This post is by Philippe Botteri from Cracking The Code


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Micha Kaufman, Fiverr’s founder and CEO

What a great achievement for Micha Kaufman and the whole team at Fiverr, which made its debut on the NYSE today. They have built a company that is changing how the world works together, and which facilitate millions of transactions between buyers and sellers across over 200 categories.

We first invested in Fiverr and its team of 40 in May 2012. Today the team supports a global network in more than 160 countries, and the platform has facilitated over 50 million transactions – between 5.5 million buyers and 830,000 sellers – opening up a new universe of talent for companies, and potential clients for independent workers.

When Fiverr began in 2010, e-commerce platforms existed to sell products. Micha, along with co-founder Shai Wininger, had the vision to see that the same was possible in services – productizing them so that buyers could enjoy

Continue reading “Fiverr rings the NYSE bell”

Fringe Companies: Bootstrap or Venture Capital?


This post is by MPD from MPD’s Blog - Medium


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This post is a continuation of my series of key segments from my book, The Fundraising Rules.

Figuring out how to finance a company is easier for some founders than others. The choice is difficult when a business could make a great lifestyle business or a great venture-scale business. To clarify, this is a somewhat unique situation, as many startups are either not viable as small lifestyle businesses or do not have the potential to achieve venture scale. I call companies that could become either of these fringe companies. To clarify, by lifestyle business I’m referring to smaller businesses (typically less than $10 million in annual sales at peak) that the founders don’t intend to sell; rather, they intend to extract profits from the business in perpetuity. A venture-scale business is one that grows to much more than $10 million in annual revenue and has real potential to ramp to

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Scaling tips from John Chambers: Part 2 – Spotlight on acquisitions and managing crises


This post is by Philippe Botteri from Cracking The Code


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At VivaTech this year, we were fortunate to be joined in conversation by former Cisco CEO and Executive Chairman John Chambers, who now invests in early-stage tech start-ups around the world. Alongside former Accel partner Joe Schoendorf, John offered insights on the realities of leading a fast-growing company and handling issues of talent, culture, strategy, and scale.

In this second extract from our roundtable, John and Joe share their playbooks for managing acquisitions as you scale and handling crises.

What is your advice on when and how to make acquisitions?

Joe:Marc Benioff at Salesforce is very good at this. He has a very clear strategy and never makes an acquisition that doesn’t fit with it. The strategy needs to come first and you then find companies to align with it, not the other way around. 

John: Having acquired 180 companies during my tenure at Cisco, I have developed Continue reading “Scaling tips from John Chambers: Part 2 – Spotlight on acquisitions and managing crises”

Want VC? Be Ready to Go Big


This post is by MPD from MPD’s Blog - Medium


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This post is a continuation of my series of key segments from my book, The Fundraising Rules.

The size of exit should also dictate whether an entrepreneur takes the VC route. Generally speaking, venture capitalists need their portfolio companies to exit for very large values in order to meaningfully impact their returns. Typically this means eight- or, better yet, nine-figure exits (tens or hundreds of millions of dollars) are required to “move the needle.” As a result, VCs may often opt to pass up opportunities to sell their portfolio companies that are showing strong potential for seven or even eight-figure valuations — they’ll want to hold out for the bigger exit. Doing so usually helps maximize returns for all parties (including the entrepreneur); however, it requires more patience and a stronger stomach for risk.

Further to this point, VCs structure their investments using liquidity preference to align incentives — compelling the entrepreneur to hold

Continue reading “Want VC? Be Ready to Go Big”

Scaling tips from John Chambers: Part 1 – Spotlight on culture and talent


This post is by Philippe Botteri from Cracking The Code


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




For the leader of any fast-growing company, every day brings a new challenge. A CEO has to manage issues of strategy, culture, talent, customer service and reputation – often all at once.

At VivaTech last week, we got an insight into the first-hand experience of John Chambers who was CEO and Chairman of Cisco from 1995-2017, and who now invests in early-stage tech start-ups around the world, with a particular focus on mentoring emerging leaders. John was joined in a roundtable discussion by Joe Schoendorf, a former Accel partner who has held senior roles at companies from Hewlett Packard to Apple, and who served on the board of the World Economic Forum.

In this first extract from our roundtable, they share their experiences in shaping company culture and handling negotiations with top talent. 

What is the secret to building a robust company culture?

Swedish music sampling startup Tracklib records $1.7 mln


This post is by Iris Dorbian from PE Hub Blog: Venture Capital Deals


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Stockholm-based Tracklib, a music sampling startup, has secured $1.7 million in funding. The investors were Sony Innovation Fund, WndrCo and Jörg Mohaupt.

PRESS RELEASE

Stockholm-based Tracklib, the world’s first record store with songs for sampling, raised $1.7 million to act on its ambitious plan to expand its user base and recording catalog. The round was joined by Sony Innovation Fund; WndrCo; and Jörg Mohaupt, a private, early-stage investor who has invested in several other music companies including Discogs and Amuse. The funding round is in preparation for a Series A funding later this year.

Tracklib will use this funding to continue expanding the user base and music catalog of its pioneering service – affordable, instant sample licensing – to bring more great music to more music producers and artists. Offering a large and diverse catalog of licensed original recordings, including unique stems and multitracks, the groundbreaking service

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Quentic scores funding from One Peak and Morgan Stanley


This post is by Iris Dorbian from PE Hub Blog: Venture Capital Deals


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Berlin-based Quentic, a European providers of software as a service solutions for environment, health, and safety and corporate social responsibility, has secured 15 million euros in funding. The investors were One Peak Partners and Morgan Stanley Expansion Capital.

Source: Press Release

On-demand staffing app Instawork lands $18 mln


This post is by Iris Dorbian from PE Hub Blog: Venture Capital Deals


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Instawork, on-demand staffing app for gig workers and hospitality businesses, has raised $18 million in funding, according to a blog post on its site. The investors were Spark Capital, GV, Burst Capital, Benchmark, Y Combinator, Tuesday Capital and SV Angel. As part of the round, Nabeel Hyatt, a general partner at Spark Capital, will join the Instawork board.

 

Common Financing Mistakes: Bootstrapping Your Company to Death


This post is by MPD from MPD’s Blog - Medium


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




This post is a continuation of my series of key segments from my book, The Fundraising Rules.

We have all heard the glamorous stories of entrepreneurs becoming billionaires by maxing out their credit cards and launching startups out of their garages. It does happen, but for every success story there are many more failures. While this doesn’t mean that entrepreneurs should cower from a challenge, there are lessons to be learned about how to mitigate some of the risk in the venture. Entrepreneurs should not over-extend their personal finances when starting a company.

While this advice does run counter to the financing strategies prevalent in entrepreneur folklore, I agree with it. When an entrepreneur assumes too much personal financial distress, he loses the ability to invest time in building a business. Put another way, as a person approaches bankruptcy, they lose freedom to be entrepreneurial. If a mountain of credit card

Continue reading “Common Financing Mistakes: Bootstrapping Your Company to Death”

Chinese travel website Mafengwo racks up $250 mln


This post is by Iris Dorbian from PE Hub Blog: Venture Capital Deals


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Mafengwo, a China-based travel website, has raised $250 million in funding. Tencent Holdings Limited led the round with participation from General Atlantic, Qiming Venture Partners, Yuantai Evergreen Investment Partners, NM Strategic Focus Fund and eGarden Ventures.

Source: Press Release