Afternoon Reads

These are worth digesting when the trading day is over:

• Volcker Named to Panel That Will Advise on Too-Big-to-Fail (Bloomberg) see also Why Bankers Need to Be Put Into Little Boxes (Harvard Business Review)
• Carlyle Group is ready for its close-up (Washington Post)
• The Demonization of Elizabeth Warren & the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (New Yorker)
• Dollar Gains Seen Evaporating as Fed Maintains Stimulus While Growth Slows (Bloomberg)
• Seymour Hersh on Iran’s nuclear capability, the Arab uprisings and Obama’s isolation (Energy Bulletin)
• When a Nobel Prize Isn’t Enough for an FOMC Seat (NY Times)
• Commodity Bubbles Caused by Speculators Need Intervention, UN Agency Says (Bloomberg)
• AOL INSIDER: Here Are 12 Reasons Why The AOL-Huffington Post Merger Is Going Down In Flames (Business Insider)
• Ron Paul Dismisses Boehner’s Dollar-for-Dollar Debt-Cut Demand (Bloomberg)
• Apple Unveils iCloud (WSJ Digits, C/NET, NYT, CNN Tech, PC Mag)

What are you reading?


Monday Reading List

Its all about Jobs, the economy and prospects for employment improvement in this morning’s reads:

• 25 Million Americans Are Unemployed Or Can’t Find Full-Time Work (NPR)
• Comparing Recessions and Recoveries: Job Changes (Economix)
• Should we be scandalized by IPO pops? (Interfluidity)
• Could Fast Food Automation Replace Low Wage Workers? (Econ Future)
• Apologies – we need a toxic rethink on the economy (FT)
• Despite Avoiding Past Economic Errors, Results Remain Disappointing (Barron’s)
• Lehman May Never Face Court Reckoning as SEC Enforcers Lean Toward Rebuke (Bloomberg)
• From Dodd-Frank to Dud: How Financial Reform May Be Going Wrong (Pro Publica)
• What Do Economic Models Really Tell Us About Elections? (NY Times)
• Microsoft’s Plans for Skype Are Unclear (NYT)

What are you reading?


Writing, and the Editing Process

One of the more interesting things about the writing is that it can be a solo exercise as well as a collaborative process.

As a solo exercise, this can veer into self indulgence — it involves allowing the mind to wander where it will, fleshing out an idea, having some fun with it — and then trusting the editor to keep the piece tight, focused and flowing. When you have but 1000 words, there is not a lot of room for indulgences.

I have learned how to never have writers block: Just crank it out. Let the editor worry about cutting it down, just let it out (with or without caffeine). When it comes to being edited, over the years I have come to trust (very) few other people’s judgment: Tom Donlan at Barron’s, Aaron Task at TheStreet.com/Yahoo (he edited Bailout Nation), and Kelly Johnson at Washington Post.

As an example of how this process works, consider this draft from tomorrow’s WaPo column on The Rise of the Cranks. The final version is much tighter and cleaner, but the process fo getting from writing to editing to published work is what I want to reference tonight.

Here’s an excerpt of the draft::

“You humans are a hardy breed. No matter how bad things might appear, your species has managed to prosper.

You survived the Ice Age, the Dark Ages, the Middle Ages, the Age of Aquarius (as well as Disco and Polyester). Mother nature has thrown floods, earthquakes, droughts, tornadoes, asteroids, tsunamis, hurricanes, melting glaciers, and global warming at you, and the worst it has done is to momentarily slow you down. Not to mention two World Wars, and widespread nuclear proliferation. Economically, you humans withstood the Panics of 1819, 1825, 1837, 1847, 1857, 1866, 1873, 1884, 1890, 1893, 1896, 1907, 1929, 1933, 1938, 1973, 1987, 1998, 2000, and 2007-09 – and that is just over the past two centuries. You also got through the Tulip Bubble, the South Sea Bubble, the Great Depression and the Great Recession, the Nifty-Fifty, Asian Contagion, the Dotcom Bubble, the sub-prime fiasco, and Bernie Madoff. Despite the best efforts of various micro-organisms, the Human population has, rather astonishingly, continued to grow: The Bubonic Plague, Great Flu Pandemic, Cholera, Typhus, Smallpox, Tuberculosis, Leprosy, Malaria, Yellow fever, SARS, Bird Flu, and AIDs have all been unable to stop you. Politically, you even managed to survive George W. Bush, and you are currently surviving Barack Obama.

What the hell is it going to take to kill your species off?

Yet despite this amazing ability to overcome all manner of adversity, we still get these “end of world” forecasts with surprisingly regularity. Given this long and storied history of survival, one has to wonder why anyone pays attention to the dang fools predicting mankind’s demise.

I found that long middle paragraph amusing That is pretty indulgent as a writer; but what came out of the editing process is much more focused and easier to read. (It should be out sometime this evening; I’ll excerpt it tomorrow AM).

When it comes to the blog, other than spelling and grammar, its pretty much my unvarnished psyche. But for print publication, its an entirely different voice — and process.


Weekend Reading List

Some interesting reads for your weekend pleasure:

• Dissecting the stock market’s P/E (Market Watch)
• Option Market-Share Data Is in Doubt as Group Calls for Review (Bloomberg)
• The big fraud in Chinese stocks (MSN Money)
• Pushing for a return to the gold standard (LA Times)
• A healthy dynamic in job creation: Destruction (Washington Post)
• Arnott Index Derided by Bogle as Witchcraft Beats Vanguard Fund (Bloomberg)
• Destroying Detroit (in Order to Save It) (GQ) See also Fiat Will Buy Rest of U.S. Chrysler Stake; Canada to Recieve $15 Million (Bloomberg)
• Maddeningly Inexact Relationship Between Unemployment and Re-Election (NY Times)
• Angel of Death: The Trial of the Suicide Doctor (Vanity Fair)
• True Enough – The second age of PR (Columbia Journalism)
• How to make searchable, Web-based Google charts (Poynter)
• Could Apple still surprise at its conference? (Market Watch)
• We’re plugged in – but checked out (Christian Science Monitor)

What are you reading?


Friday AM Reads

Once you digest today’s punk unemployment data, here are some worthwhile Friday reads:

• Chinese Economic Slowdown May Lead to 75% Plunge in Commodities, S&P Says (Bloomberg)
• The Rising Price of Oil and the Quality of Your Asparagus (Daily Reckoning)
• Battle of the fund titans:
. . . .-David Einhorn’s Speech at the Sohn Conference (Insider Monkey)
. . . .-Bruce Berkowitz: ‘Beat the Pack by Breaking From It’ (Seeking Alpha)
• The Death of the American Dream I (American Interest)
• Daily Price Indexes show inflation is tame (Billion Prices Project)
• When Washington Took On Wall Street (Vanity Fair)
• Study finds many corporations pay tax rate of effectively zero (The Hill) see also GE, Exxon, 10 Other Major Corporations Paid Negative Tax Rate (MoJo)
Huge data dump: Statistics from A to Z – Beta version (OECD)
• Killer App: Army Tests Smartphones for Combat (WSJ)
• Practical Tips on Writing a Book from 23 Brilliant Authors (Neuro Tribes)

What are you reading?


Late Afternoon Reading

Quite a few fascinating items added to Instapaper today — these are what I will be reading on the way home tonight:

The Tiffany Economy: A Tale of Two Recoveries (Morningstar)
• Is the Slow Economic Data Due to Japan or Something Deeper? (Be Spoke)
Geithner and Goldman, Thick as Thieves (Truth Dig)
• May Consumer Bankruptcy Filings Fall 16% Year-Year (US Bankruptcy Institute)
• Manhattan Builders Plan Biggest Decade for Towers Since ’80s (Bloomberg)
• All eyes on Bernanke, but QE3 has sailed (Market Watch)
• When the Value of Housing Ruins the Home (WSJ)
Jann Wenner: Magazines’ Rush to iPad Is ‘Sheer Insanity and Insecurity and Fear’ (Ad Age)
Pixar’s Motto: Going From Suck to Nonsuck (Fast Company)
New Twitter follow: Market Wisdom: Quotes from famous traders and managers on investing and money (Twitter)

What are you reading?


Thursday Morning Reads

Here are the latest adds to my Instpaper:

• Expect More ‘Unexpectedly’ Weak Economic Data (Barrons)
• Big Banks Cash In on Commodities (WSJ)
• Silver Bug Goes Viral With Marketing War (AdWeek)
• China Lending-Binge Hangover Looms in 2013 (Bloomberg)
• Rebuilding the wall of worry takes time (Market Watch)
• For a Whistle-Blower, No Good Deed Goes Unpunished (Deal Book)
• The Dirty Talk Of The Town: Profanity At “The New Yorker” (Awl)
• Eighty-one Years. Seventy-nine Movies. Two Oscars. Not One Bad Performance. (GQ)
• Who gets Attention on Twitter? (TNT)
• Can Bill Simmons Win the Big One? (NYT)

What are you reading?


Afternoon Reading List

Here are today’s Instapaper reads:

• Lehman Veteran Is Back in Game (WSJ)
• Small Windows in an Unfavorable Long-Term Picture (Hussman Funds)
• Buy Cheap Bonds with Safe Spread (Pimco)
• Intolerable choices for the eurozone (FT)
• How formulaic housing coverage fails to serve home buyers (Poynter)
• India Is Growing, But Indians Are Still Starving (Boston Review)
• The Only Thing that Really Matters (HBR)
Live and Learn: Why we have college (New Yorker)
• Physics meets cancer: The disruptor (Nature)
• When We’re Cowed by the Crowd  (WSJ)

What are you reading?


Afternoon Reading List

Here are today’s Instapaper reads:

• Lehman Veteran Is Back in Game (WSJ)
• Small Windows in an Unfavorable Long-Term Picture (Hussman Funds)
• Buy Cheap Bonds with Safe Spread (Pimco)
• Intolerable choices for the eurozone (FT)
• How formulaic housing coverage fails to serve home buyers (Poynter)
• India Is Growing, But Indians Are Still Starving (Boston Review)
• The Only Thing that Really Matters (HBR)
Live and Learn: Why we have college (New Yorker)
• Physics meets cancer: The disruptor (Nature)
• When We’re Cowed by the Crowd  (WSJ)

What are you reading?


Afternoon Reading List

Here are today’s Instapaper reads:

• Lehman Veteran Is Back in Game (WSJ)
• Small Windows in an Unfavorable Long-Term Picture (Hussman Funds)
• Buy Cheap Bonds with Safe Spread (Pimco)
• Intolerable choices for the eurozone (FT)
• How formulaic housing coverage fails to serve home buyers (Poynter)
• India Is Growing, But Indians Are Still Starving (Boston Review)
• The Only Thing that Really Matters (HBR)
Live and Learn: Why we have college (New Yorker)
• Physics meets cancer: The disruptor (Nature)
• When We’re Cowed by the Crowd  (WSJ)

What are you reading?


Mid-Week Reads

Here are today’s Instapaper reads:

• Why 64% Ownership Is the Golden Mean in the Housing Market (Bloomberg)
• S.E.C. Case Stands Out Because It Stands Alone (NYT)
• Adjusting Wage Disparities for Cost of Living (WSJ)
• WikiLeaks: Saudis often warned U.S. about oil speculators (McClatchy)
• Rising Rents Risk U.S. Inflation as Fed Restraint Questioned (Bloomberg)
• How American medicine is destroying itself (TNR)
• Japan nuclear crisis: Pensioners seek work at Fukushima (BBC)
• As Physicians’ Jobs Change, So Do Their Politics (NYT)
• Winning Argument: As a ‘New’ Critique of Reason, Argumentative Theory Is Trite but Useful (Scientific American)
• Jenny Lewis Has a Boyfriend (Music Angle)

What are you reading?


Mid-Week Reads

Here are today’s Instapaper reads:

• Why 64% Ownership Is the Golden Mean in the Housing Market (Bloomberg)
• S.E.C. Case Stands Out Because It Stands Alone (NYT)
• Adjusting Wage Disparities for Cost of Living (WSJ)
• WikiLeaks: Saudis often warned U.S. about oil speculators (McClatchy)
• Rising Rents Risk U.S. Inflation as Fed Restraint Questioned (Bloomberg)
• How American medicine is destroying itself (TNR)
• Japan nuclear crisis: Pensioners seek work at Fukushima (BBC)
• As Physicians’ Jobs Change, So Do Their Politics (NYT)
• Winning Argument: As a ‘New’ Critique of Reason, Argumentative Theory Is Trite but Useful (Scientific American)
• Jenny Lewis Has a Boyfriend (Music Angle)

What are you reading?


Mid-Week Reads

Here are today’s Instapaper reads:

• Why 64% Ownership Is the Golden Mean in the Housing Market (Bloomberg)
• S.E.C. Case Stands Out Because It Stands Alone (NYT)
• Adjusting Wage Disparities for Cost of Living (WSJ)
• WikiLeaks: Saudis often warned U.S. about oil speculators (McClatchy)
• Rising Rents Risk U.S. Inflation as Fed Restraint Questioned (Bloomberg)
• How American medicine is destroying itself (TNR)
• Japan nuclear crisis: Pensioners seek work at Fukushima (BBC)
• As Physicians’ Jobs Change, So Do Their Politics (NYT)
• Winning Argument: As a ‘New’ Critique of Reason, Argumentative Theory Is Trite but Useful (Scientific American)
• Jenny Lewis Has a Boyfriend (Music Angle)

What are you reading?


Mid-Week Reads

Here are today’s Instapaper reads:

• Why 64% Ownership Is the Golden Mean in the Housing Market (Bloomberg)
• S.E.C. Case Stands Out Because It Stands Alone (NYT)
• Adjusting Wage Disparities for Cost of Living (WSJ)
• WikiLeaks: Saudis often warned U.S. about oil speculators (McClatchy)
• Rising Rents Risk U.S. Inflation as Fed Restraint Questioned (Bloomberg)
• How American medicine is destroying itself (TNR)
• Japan nuclear crisis: Pensioners seek work at Fukushima (BBC)
• As Physicians’ Jobs Change, So Do Their Politics (NYT)
• Winning Argument: As a ‘New’ Critique of Reason, Argumentative Theory Is Trite but Useful (Scientific American)
• Jenny Lewis Has a Boyfriend (Music Angle)

What are you reading?


Late Afternoon Reading

Quite a few things added to my Instapaper today — This is what I will be reading on the way home tonight:

• Not a Flashy Investor, Just Successful (NYT)
• House to reject debt limit increase without cuts (BusinessWeek/AP)
• Five Questions on Tuesday’s  Case-Shiller (WSJ) see also New Blog from S&P/Case Shiller (Housing Views)
• R.I.P. Reaganomics Revolution: 1981-2011 (Market Watch)
• iCloud, YouCloud, We All Scream For iCloud. But What Exactly Will It Be? (Tech Crunch)
• Public Wants 60 MPG Cars, But Don’t Listen To Them (AOL Autos)
• The U.S. Postal Service Nears Collapse (Bloomberg)
• Readers of the Pack: American Best-Selling (Book Forum)
• John Lasseter/Pixar: Father of the Year (Esquire)
• Pete Townsend at 66: Won’t Get Fooled Again (More Intelligent Life)

What are you reading?


Tuesday Morning Reads

This is what I read this morning: A mix of unusual and interesting reading to start my week:

• Are Taxes in the U.S. High or Low? (Economix)
• Mobius Says Fresh Financial Crisis Around Corner Amid Volatile Derivatives (Bloomberg)
• What happens when Greece defaults (Telegraph)
• Faith and the markets (Economist)
• As Physicians’ Jobs Change, So Do Their Politics (NYT)
• Cyber Combat: Act of War (WSJ)
• The GOP’s self-destruction derby (Washington Post)
• How David Beats Goliath (New Yorker)
• Gil Scott-Heron, Voice of Black Culture, Dies at 62 (NYT Obit) See also New York Is Killing Me (New Yorker, August 2010)
• Awesome People Hanging Out Together (APHT)

What are you reading?


Reads from Twitter

This morning, I offer you a different set of links — these were all found on my Twitter feed over the past 24 hours:

• An IPO That Popped, Then Fizzled (WSJ) Interesting look back as TheStreet.com in the age of Linked In
• Insider trading in the House…of Representatives (FT Alphaville)
• Funds Revive Ag Bets as Drought Hurt Crops (Bloomberg)
• Germany to scrap nuclear power by 2022 (FT.com)
• Cheap houses, poor workers (Economist Buttonwood)
• Consumer PC sales growth declines for first time ever: iPad the culprit? (eWallStreeter)
• Giuliani surprise leader in Republican poll (Reuters)
• The Startup Genome Project  (Steve Blank)
• Blade Runner Polaroids (Sean Young)
• A Scientist Goes to the Creation Museum So You Don’t Have To (Eveloce)

What are you Tweeting?