Inside Arizona’s Latest Clash Over Renewable Energy Targets

Arizona's politics over renewable energy have always been contentious. As the state considers adding new targets, this year is no different.


There are two proposals to increase Arizona&rsquo;s renewable portfolio standard. One, a ballot initiative, would add a 50 percent renewable energy mandate (sans nuclear) by 2030 to the state&rsquo;s constitution. <a href="https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/arizona-regulator-proposes-sweeping-clean-energy-plan#gs.xD3Ej1w">The other</a>, proposed separately by a member of the Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC), would increase the state&rsquo;s renewable portfolio standard to 80 percent (including nuclear) by 2050.&nbsp;


<a href="https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/tag/arizona-public-service">Arizona Public Service Company</a> (APS), which services 1.2 million Arizonans in 11 of the state&rsquo;s 15 counties, favors the ACC initiative and says the ballot measure would reduce its ability to choose the resources best suited to its customers. Ballot initiative supporters say the utility&rsquo;s reliance on natural gas makes little sense in a state with copious solar resources. Commissioner Andy Tobin, the ACC member that introduced the initiative, <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreentechMedia?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></div>
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UK Risks Missing Clean Energy Targets, Despite Recent Renewables Growth

A bumper year for renewable generation capacity in 2017 has put the U.K. on course to meet its target for renewable-produced electricity. But the country still risks missing overall renewable energy targets because of sluggish progress on heat and transportation, a research firm has warned.


Last year saw renewable energy&#39;s share of electricity generation in the U.K. jump up by 4.8 percent, from 24.5 percent to 29.3 percent. This was the second highest annual rise on record, after a 5.5 percent increase in 2015 which took the renewables share to 24.6 percent.&nbsp;


The 2017 boost puts the U.K. within spitting distance of its 30 percent target for renewable-based electricity generation by 2020. It will help the country meet its European Union (E.U.) and internal carbon budgets, said Tim Dixon, wholesale team leader at Cornwall Insight.


However, he added: &ldquo;Unless <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreentechMedia?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></div>
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Reading Republicans on Climate a Decade After America’s Cap-and-Trade Collapse

Ten years ago, in the summer of 2009, the U.S. House passed a landmark cap-and-trade bill. Then it died in the Senate a year later.


The politics of climate have been completely frozen ever since.


The rise of the Tea Party, Republican anti-Obama sentiment, and an influx of money against pro-climate candidates derailed the issue. Republicans stopped engaging&nbsp;&mdash; and the ones who did believe in finding solutions were either "primaried" out of office, or just fell silent.&nbsp;


One group, <a href="http://www.republicen.org/" >RepublicEN</a>, has been working hard to rally grassroots support in Congress for conservative, free-market climate solutions. It&#39;s a small organization looking to influence a party in the midst of a tumultuous transition. But Alex Bozmoski, the group&rsquo;s managing director, thinks it&#39;s still possible to move the needle on climate in Congress.


In this week&#39;s episode of <em>The Interchange</em>, we&#39;ll talk with Bozmoski about how to reach conservatives, <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreentechMedia?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></div>
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New York Calls for 50% Renewables by 2030

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has directed the state&rsquo;s department of public service to enact a <a href="https://www.governor.ny.gov/sites/governor.ny.gov/files/atoms/files/RenewableEnergyLetter_1.pdf" >new clean energy standard</a> that calls for half of the electricity consumed in the state to come from clean and renewable resources.


Under the Reforming the Energy Vision proceeding, New York already had a goal of 50 percent renewables by 2030, but the Department of Public Service will now codify that goal.


&ldquo;By mandating a Clean Energy Standard, we ensure that this goal is converted from aspirational to actionable,&rdquo; Cuomo wrote in the letter to the commission. The regulators will have to develop the standard by June 2016. The state&rsquo;s 2015 Energy Plan already calls for cutting carbon emissions 40 percent by 2030.


New York gets more than <a href="http://www.nyiso.com/public/about_nyiso/importance_of_reliability/powering_new_york/index.jsp" >10 percent of its electricity</a> from hydro. Pumped storage and wind each account for about 4 percent as well.


New York is now in <a href="https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=21852" >elite company</a> <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreentechMedia?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></div>
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Hillary Clinton: FERC Should Focus More on Climate When Considering Pipelines

Last week, Hillary Clinton was in New Hampshire&nbsp;<a href="http://www.c-span.org/video/?328774-1/hillary-clinton-town-hall-meeting-keene-new-hampshire" >fielding questions</a> about student debt and the state&#39;s heroin epidemic.&nbsp;


About 30 minutes into the event, Clinton used a question about a proposed pipeline in Southern New Hampshire to address how regulators should approach climate change and encourage cleaner energy sources.


The attendee did not ask about climate change, but instead raised concerns about a proposed natural gas pipeline and the role of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.


The woman was concerned that FERC &ldquo;is funded by big oil and gas&rdquo; and therefore failed to consider input from local stakeholders. FERC is a federal agency funded through national budgets. However, it does <a href="http://www.ferc.gov/industries/electric/annual-charges.asp" >receive filing fees</a> from the industries it regulates and imposes some annual charges. Clinton dismissed the funding issue, but addressed the broader issue of federal energy planning.


&ldquo;The process FERC has in place does not give enough weight to <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreentechMedia?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></div>
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