No-Deal Brexit Leaves Renewables Exposed

The fate of U.K. renewable energy exports to Europe hangs in the balance after policymakers failed to achieve a breakthrough in Brexit talks over the weekend.


Last month, the British government admitted renewable energy exports to Europe may be compromised if the U.K. exits the European Union without a deal next March. That scenario now seems increasingly likely after <a href="http://www.reuters.com/article/us-britain-eu/brexit-talks-stall-before-midweek-eu-summit-idUSKCN1MO0FU" >talks stalled Sunday</a>, ahead of a European Union summit this week.&nbsp;


The impasse means U.K.-based renewable energy exporters may find their renewable energy guarantees of origin are no longer recognized in the EU, according to a U.K. Department for Business, Energy &amp; Industrial Strategy (BEIS) <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/generating-low-carbon-electricity-if-theres-no-brexit-deal" >guidance note</a> last month.&nbsp;


A no-deal on Brexit &ldquo;will mean that existing contracts with EU countries&rsquo; electricity suppliers or traders may be compromised if the contract terms require the transfer of a Renewable Energy Guarantee of Origin recognized <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreentechMedia?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></div>
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Finding (Politically Viable) Climate Solutions as the Stakes Rise

Cutting fossil fuel subsidies, updating building codes, offering electric vehicle ridesharing programs for farm workers, and more. In this show, we talk climate solutions.


A new landmark United Nations climate report concluded that world leaders have just 12 years to fundamentally restructure society, including dramatic changes to&nbsp;<a href="https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/ipcc-renewables-85-electricity-worst-impacts-climate-change" >the energy system</a>, if we are to avoid the most disastrous impacts of climate change.


That&rsquo;s not a very sunny outlook. Particularly in today&rsquo;s partisan political landscape. And yet, stakeholders continue to push for climate policy action.


In this episode, we speak to experts at the clean economy group Green for All, the conservative think tank R Street Institute, and the policy firm Energy Innovation about the policies believe are necessary &mdash; and politically feasible &mdash; to implement.


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California Legislative Roundup: What Passed, and What Didn’t

California lawmakers ended last week with a long list of energy and environmental bills that they passed &mdash; and a shorter list of those that failed to come to a vote.&nbsp;


We&rsquo;ve already covered the highest-profile bills that managed to win enough votes to move on to Gov. Jerry Brown&rsquo;s desk for a signature by Sept. 30. Those include&nbsp;<a href="https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/on-to-the-governors-desk-what-100-clean-energy-means-for-california">SB 100</a>&nbsp;and its new 100-percent clean energy mandate;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/california-passes-bill-to-extend-incentives-for-behind-the-meter-batteries#gs.51wuhvI">SB 700</a>&nbsp;and its extension of behind-the-meter energy storage incentives; and&nbsp;<a href="https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/california-passes-pge-wildfire-relief-bill-but-grid-regionalization-fails#gs.1BfjQ_8">AB 901</a>, the sprawling and controversial bill to give utilities including Pacific Gas &amp; Electric ways to manage the multi-billion dollar costs of wildfires past and future.&nbsp;


We also covered the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/california-passes-pge-wildfire-relief-bill-but-grid-regionalization-fails#gs.1BfjQ_8">failure of AB 813</a>, the &ldquo;grid regionalization&rdquo; bill that would have allowed California to take the first steps toward expanding its grid operator CAISO across the Western U.S..&nbsp;


Here are some of the other <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreentechMedia?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></div>
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An Interview With ‘Losing Earth’ Author Nathaniel Rich

This week, we&#39;re using an entire episode to discuss an ambitious piece of reporting on climate change. Earlier this month, the <em>New York Times Magazine</em> devoted an entire issue to a specific period of time in modern history: 1979 and 1989.


It was a time when we first reckoned with the impact of climate change &mdash; a period of great awakening in science, politics and industry to the threat of greenhouse gases.


As we&rsquo;re painfully aware, that awakening didn&rsquo;t turn into action. The 31,000-word piece weaves together a narrative to help explain why &mdash; when everyone seemed to be on the same page about the threat&nbsp;&mdash; we failed.


We talk with author Nathaniel Rich about the reason he wrote the piece, detail some of the most important moments during the decade, and address criticisms.


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The Energy Gang<em>&nbsp;is brought to you by Mission Solar Energy, a solar module manufacturer based <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreentechMedia?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></div>
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A Climate Debate: Incrementalism vs. Wholesale Change

Are people who care about climate change downplaying the issue under social and political pressure? Has their alarmism been too muted? Or has the outcry become so loud that it&#39;s drowning out the possibility of collective action? The jury is out.


In this episode of Political Climate, we tackle a difficult question posed by a listener on the severity of the climate threat and the appropriate policy response. Amy Harder, energy and climate reporter for Axios, joins us to discuss.


But first we revisit the Democratic National Committee. The DNC has decided to once again accept donations from fossil fuel interests. The move comes just two months after the committee&nbsp;adopted a separate resolution banning donations from political action committees tied to coal, oil and gas companies. The reversal has spurred a debate among Democrats on matching up policies and values.


We also discuss the Kigali Amendment &mdash; a global climate <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreentechMedia?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></div>
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Inside Arizona’s Latest Clash Over Renewable Energy Targets

Arizona&#39;s politics over renewable energy have always been contentious. As the state considers adding new targets, this year is no different.


There are two proposals to increase Arizona&rsquo;s renewable portfolio standard. One, a ballot initiative, would add a 50 percent renewable energy mandate (sans nuclear) by 2030 to the state&rsquo;s constitution. <a href="https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/arizona-regulator-proposes-sweeping-clean-energy-plan#gs.xD3Ej1w">The other</a>, proposed separately by a member of the Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC), would increase the state&rsquo;s renewable portfolio standard to 80 percent (including nuclear) by 2050.&nbsp;


<a href="https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/tag/arizona-public-service">Arizona Public Service Company</a> (APS), which services 1.2 million Arizonans in 11 of the state&rsquo;s 15 counties, favors the ACC initiative and says the ballot measure would reduce its ability to choose the resources best suited to its customers. Ballot initiative supporters say the utility&rsquo;s reliance on natural gas makes little sense in a state with copious solar resources. Commissioner Andy Tobin, the ACC member that introduced the initiative, <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreentechMedia?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></div>
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UK Risks Missing Clean Energy Targets, Despite Recent Renewables Growth

A bumper year for renewable generation capacity in 2017 has put the U.K. on course to meet its target for renewable-produced electricity. But the country still risks missing overall renewable energy targets because of sluggish progress on heat and transportation, a research firm has warned.


Last year saw renewable energy&#39;s share of electricity generation in the U.K. jump up by 4.8 percent, from 24.5 percent to 29.3 percent. This was the second highest annual rise on record, after a 5.5 percent increase in 2015 which took the renewables share to 24.6 percent.&nbsp;


The 2017 boost puts the U.K. within spitting distance of its 30 percent target for renewable-based electricity generation by 2020. It will help the country meet its European Union (E.U.) and internal carbon budgets, said Tim Dixon, wholesale team leader at Cornwall Insight.


However, he added: &ldquo;Unless <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreentechMedia?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></div>
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Reading Republicans on Climate a Decade After America’s Cap-and-Trade Collapse

Ten years ago, in the summer of 2009, the U.S. House passed a landmark cap-and-trade bill. Then it died in the Senate a year later.


The politics of climate have been completely frozen ever since.


The rise of the Tea Party, Republican anti-Obama sentiment, and an influx of money against pro-climate candidates derailed the issue. Republicans stopped engaging&nbsp;&mdash; and the ones who did believe in finding solutions were either "primaried" out of office, or just fell silent.&nbsp;


One group, <a href="http://www.republicen.org/" >RepublicEN</a>, has been working hard to rally grassroots support in Congress for conservative, free-market climate solutions. It&#39;s a small organization looking to influence a party in the midst of a tumultuous transition. But Alex Bozmoski, the group&rsquo;s managing director, thinks it&#39;s still possible to move the needle on climate in Congress.


In this week&#39;s episode of <em>The Interchange</em>, we&#39;ll talk with Bozmoski about how to reach conservatives, <div class="post-limited-image"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreentechMedia?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></div>
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